FLOWERS

A UK edition of this sumptuous book has now been published.

 

A Celebration of Botanical Art By Rosie Sanders
Often compared to the work of Georgia o’Keeffee, Rosie Sanders’ botanical paintings lie at the extreme end of botanical art – they exude dynamism and sensuality in every brushstroke and their richness of colour sets her apart from her contemporaries.
In this beautifully illustrated book, Rosie exhibits a selection of flowers, from tulips to orchids, roses to irises, anemones to amaryllis – and illuminates them with fascinating and skilful uses of perspective, colour and light.
This large-format book is a celebration of botanical art, showcasing over 70 of Rosie Sanders’ flower paintings in exquisite detail. Each painting
is accompanied by an excellent and accessible scientific comentary by renowned botanist Dr Andreas Honegger.
Rosie Sanders is a botanical artist whose work has been displayed in many galleries, including the Shirley Sherwood Gallery of Botanical Art in Kew Gardens and the Park Wall Gallery. She has been awarded five Gold medals by the Royal Horticultural Society and won the Royal Academy miniature award. Rosie lives in Devon where she gives residential and non-residential botanical painting courses. She is available for interviews.
For all publicity enquiries, please contact Frida Green Tel: 020 7462 1519 E-mail: fgreen@pavilionbooks.com

 

BLUTEN

In 2015 a book was published in Germany of all the large flower paintings.   It is a large format book in full colour with text about the flowers by the botanist Dr. Andreas Honegger.  there is also a spanish edition.

 

 

Prices of Original Watercolours

Sizes are of the painting, not framed size. Prices are quoted for framed works with hand gessoed frames and UV museum glass.

60 x 70 cms £5,000

102 x 102 cms £14,000

102 x 124 cms £15,000

102 x 154 cms £16,000

 

 

Artist Prints Information

Monotype is a form of printmaking made by drawing or painting an image on to an acrylic or metal surface, which is then transferred to paper by means of a press. This produces a unique print, or monotype. Most of the ink is transferred during the initial pressing and although a second print, known as a ghost print, is sometimes possible, this is generally considered inferior. Monotypes are often more spontaneous and more freely drawn making it an exciting and challenging alternative to painting.original